Connecting you to the Adirondacks, from afar

 

While we may not be able to gather for our beloved Lake Placid events this summer, we at Lake Placid Land Conservancy will still be working hard to connect you to conservation from afar.

We just launched a new, interactive StoryMap to share some successes of our Conservation Monitoring Program (https://bit.ly/2ZYOBqS). This StoryMap gives you a peek at some of the 120 species of plants wildlife we documented through our private lands monitoring initiative. We collected information across 10 locations and landscapes in the North Country over the past three years to document seasonal change and better understand how wildlife access, use, and move through private lands in our communities. Sound interesting? Click the link to learn more and see how you can get involved.

We just received a grant, in partnership with the Town of Jay Parks Committee, from Northern New York Audubon to plant a conservation area at Douglas Park in Jay. We will be installing native plants to provide habitat for birds and other pollinators while also creating a beautiful, naturalized garden for the community to enjoy. In addition to the plantings, we are adding an interpretive sign to inform visitors about the space. We are so excited about this partnership and project, and grateful for the opportunity to create another physically distant place for our neighbors and visitors to escape to outside.

Lastly, we ramped up our digital offerings on our social media platforms (@ConserveLandADK) in order to safely bring the Adirondacks to you at home. We’re still sharing beautiful images of local landscapes, wildlife, and our conservation areas, but we’ve also created a variety of activities, including coloring pages, nature bingo, and scavenger hunts, for you and your family to do from home. We will continue to bring the Adirondacks to you digitally, so be sure to give us a follow if you haven’t already. And be sure to sign up for our mailing list to receive information and updates about our work and local conservation topics.

While we don’t yet know when we will be able to safely gather as we did in the past, you can rest assured we’re working hard to steward the lands we love. The Adirondacks will be here waiting when it’s safe for you to return. We’re here to make sure you’re not missing out in the meantime.